Guides and Tips for your next gambian

adventure

The crocodile pond

Before entering the area around the crocodile pond, be sure to visit the museum that tells so much of our history.
On your way from the museum to the pond, notice the beautiful baobab trees.

At the pond are around 100 Nile crocodiles. They are well fed, but you can't trust a crocodile, so pay attention to the local guides and what they say: Never touch the head of the crocodile. And only touch a crocodile if the local pond guide tells you it is okay. They know what they talk about, since they all have 10 fingers.

Ask at the hotel reception for guidance on how to find the crocodile pond.

Lamin Lodge

Try a bot trip on the river. A good place to do it, is from Lamin Lodge. Lamin Lodge is a small community where everybody helps everybody. And you help them by supporting there village. 
They know the area and quite a few stories about the treehouse (a hollow tree large enough to house your family). You can pick wild growing mango on the way..... yummy!
The hotel staff will be happy to give you directions on how to get there, or even drive you.

The Reptile farm

The nearby reptile farm is a fantastic place, where the guides really know what they are talking about. They care for the animals, which are mainly local Gambian reptiles. There is no inbreeding and they are caught and released at regular intervals. Though not released near the reptile farm, so no wirries, it's a safe place to be.
Remember: They are more scared of you than you are of them!  And you can touch and hold most of the different lizards, turtles and snakes, if the guides offer this to you. And it is completely OK to say NO!

Travel Photography Advice

The nearby reptile farm is a fantastic place, where the guides really know what they are talking about. They care for the animals, which are mainly local Gambian reptiles. There is no inbreeding and the reptiles are caught and released at regular intervals. Though not released near the reptile farm, so no worries, it's a safe place to be.
Remember: They are more scared of you than you are of them!  And you can touch and hold most of the different lizards, turtles and snakes.
In case you miss any information or just want to give us feedback, please feel free to contact us.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is it safe to travel in the Gambia?

The Gambia is the smallest country on the mainland of Africa. And we have the lowest cime rate in Africa. It safe to go around in the Gambia, if you take the same precautions as you would at home.

What are the prices at the market?

And will the shop owners be angry with me if i try to lower the price? No, they expect you to lower their suggested price.  A general rule of thumb is: The correct price will be half of their suggested price, but they won't give up without a battle :-)

What should I do if I get sick?

The staff at the can get you to a doctor, or even get the doctor to the hotel. Contact them and tell them what your illness is.

Should I use cash money or credit cards for my trips?

In most cases cash is king. And in general the Gambia is a cheap place to go shopping. At the larger stores and groceries it is possible to use creditcards, just like at home. But in the markets and smaller local shops: Expect to use cash (Gambian Dalasi).

Do I have to learn new languages?

In the Gambia, Mandingo is spoken as a first language by 38% of the population, Fula is spoken by 21.2%, Wolof / Serer by 18%, Jola by 4.5%. Several other languages are also spoken. Gambian Sign Language is used by the deaf.

But...English is the main language used for official purposes and in education. Everybody speaks English in the Gambia.

Where do I find people for group trips and adventures?

In general you don't have to round up people for the trisp. Just go to the reception and we will find you a competent guide: Be it for birdwathcing, city walks, reptiles or nature in general.

Just ask us: We have it!